South Wales is home to Tenby, one of Wales’ premier holiday resorts, famous for its beautiful sandy beaches, clean seas and stunning scenery. Situated on Pembrokeshire’s south coast it is a mere two hours drive from the Severn Bridge. The coast around Pembrokeshire and the Gower Peninsula in Swansea, in particular, have stunning coastal paths and sandy beaches, and the area boasts an abundance of castles.

South Wales Bed & Breakfasts and Holiday Cottages

   
Vale of Glamorgan Listings                       Pembrokeshire Listings                             Swansea Listings

   
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South Wales is a very mixed area. There is stunning pastoral scenery in many parts of South West Wales, the Vale of Glamorgan near Cardiff and the Wye Valley in the historic county of Monmouthshire. Wales' two largest cities, Cardiff and Swansea, are both located in the historic county of Glamorgan and offer an excellent selection of stores, restaurants and entertainment opportunities.

The coast around Pembrokeshire and the Gower Peninsula in Swansea, in particular, have stunning coastal paths and sandy beaches, and the area boasts an abundance of castles. In addition, South Wales has a proud industrial heritage, with Port Talbot being a major steel processing town, while the valleys in central Glamorgan were once the center of the Welsh coal mining industry. Since the 60s, Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire have been very popular with people involved in alternative and counter culture; consequently South West Wales has become home to many communes and organic farms.

No part of the 160 mile border between England and Wales is more obviously, undeniably, a fact of the landscape than the eight-mile ridge between Hatterall Hill and Hay Bluff. There was no need for Offa to build a dyke here as nature had done the work for him. It still marks the border between England and Wales. From the east the Black Mountains really do look black: a brooding form silhouetted against the sky. They must have been named by the Saxons, who always looked upon them from the east.